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Stage, screen actress Ruby Dee dead at 91

Stage, screen actress Ruby Dee dead at 91

RUBY DEE:Actress Ruby Dee arrives for the Apollo Theater's annual Hall of Fame induction ceremony Monday, June 2, 2008 in New York. Photo: Associated Press/Jason DeCrow

NEW YORK (Reuters) – By Will Dunham

(Reuters) – Legendary stage and screen actress Ruby Dee, who won acclaim on stage, in film and television and became a notable figure in the U.S. civil rights movement, died peacefully at home, a friend of the family said on Thursday.

The actress, who was 91, died on Wednesday night in New Rochelle, New York, surrounded by her family.

“She died of natural causes,” said Arminda Thomas, who works for Dee’s family. “She was blessed with old age.”

The petite actress won an Oscar nomination in 2008 for her role in “American Gangster.” After being nominated for six Emmys, she won the award in 1991 for her role in the TV movie “Decoration Day.”

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Dee was married to actor Ossie Davis for 56 years until his death in 2005. The couple, who had three children, formed an exceptionally productive and enduring artistic and activist partnership. They performed together in 11 plays and five films and appeared together at some of the seminal events of the turbulent civil rights era.

The actress broke free from the racially stereotypical roles often given to black actresses when she began her career in the 1940s and continued to act into her 90s.

Dee and Davis were equally famous for their political activism, even as they paid a price for it in terms of their careers. They denounced Senator Joseph McCarthy’s anti-Communist crusades of the 1950s and were blacklisted for a time. They also were investigated by FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover’s agents. They counted civil rights leader Martin Luther King and black activist Malcolm X among their friends and took part in marches for racial equality in the South. Dee and Davis were emcees of the landmark 1963 March on Washington where King gave his celebrated “I Have a Dream” speech yearning for a land where blacks “will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” Dee addressed the hundreds of thousands of people thronging the grounds of the Lincoln Memorial for one of the most famous rights demonstrations in American history. The couple were honored in 2004 at the Kennedy Center in Washington for their lifetime contributions to theater, TV and movies as well as their advocacy for equality. The Kennedy Center recognized them as “two of the most prolific and fearless artists in American culture,” stating: “With courage and tenacity they have thrown open many a door previously shut tight to African American artists and planted the seed for the flowering of America’s multicultural humanity.”

Dee was born as Ruby Ann Wallace in Cleveland, the daughter of a train porter and a schoolteacher, and was raised in the Harlem section of New York City.

She attended Hunter College in New York, then joined the American Negro Theater in 1941 before making her way to Broadway. She also became the first black actress to perform lead roles at the American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Connecticut.

In 1946, she appeared on Broadway with Davis, who also became a director and playwright, in “Jeb,” about a black soldier back from World War Two who confronts the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan.

Dee’s films include “The Jackie Robinson Story” (1950) in which she co-starred with Robinson, portraying himself in the tale of major league baseball’s first black player, as well as “A Raisin in the Sun” (1961) with Sidney Poitier and Spike Lee’s movies “Do the Right Thing” (1989) and “Jungle Fever” (1991).

(Additonal reporting by Patricia Reaney; Editing by James Dalgleish, Jan Paschal and Andrew Hay)

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