Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

PATERNITY LEAVE:New York Mets Daniel Murphy (28) at bat in the ninth inning of the baseball game against the Atlanta Braves Wednesday, April 9, in Atlanta. The Braves won the game 4-3. Photo: Associated Press/Todd Kirkland


When New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy was criticized on talk radio for spending three days with his family after the birth of his son, teammates, coaches and opponents leapt to his defense.

The four major pro sports leagues in North America are becoming increasingly open to paternity leave as more players express a desire to be with their families when a baby arrives.

Major League Baseball is the only league with a standardized policy written into its rulebook. But the NFL, NBA and NHL have all shown willingness to give their players some time when that day comes.

Players say that kind of compassion is a welcome change from decades ago, when athletes often missed one of life’s biggest moments to stay with their teams.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

The first word of the new ‘Star Wars’ movie is …


Director J.J. reveals the first word spoken in "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," which hits theaters next month.

in Entertainment

Jennifer Lawrence named entertainer of the year


The star is one of the biggest and bankable actresses in Hollywood and has featured in a number of blockbusters including the "X-Men" franchise and "The Hunger Games" films.

in Music

Billy Gibbons goes jazz


The ZZ Top guitarist didn't really think about ever playing jazz until he was invited last year to play the Havana Jazz Festival.

in Entertainment

‘Rocky’ successor ‘Creed’ highlights Philadelphia’s revival


Adonis Johnson, the son of Balboa rival-turned-mentor Apollo Creed, leaves behind a life of privilege to walk in the footsteps of a father he never knew.

in Weird

Texas police arrest man in ‘Cookie Monster’ robberies


Houston-area police have arrested a man dubbed the "Cookie Monster" robber who is suspected in holdups at more than 30 fast-food restaurants, often demanding that a cookie be handed over along with the cash.